Best Days And Times To Post To Your LinkedIn Company Page

best days and times to update linkedin company page

It’s a question we get a lot—what are the best days and times to update a LinkedIn Company Page? To answer that, let’s first take a look at what several different studies on the subject have to say.
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9 LinkedIn Best Practices For 2015

LinkedIn best practices 2015
LinkedIn is still the go-to social network for business professionals and job seekers. It’s a great tool to showcase your business and your employees. To make sure you’re using it effectively, follow these nine best practices.
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LinkedIn Recommendations – Just Do It!

We all have those people that have made a difference in our personal and professional lives. And I know these would be people I would be happy to recommend in a heartbeat on LinkedIn.

But then it comes time to sit down and actually write the recommendation…

I’ll admit I’ve written, analyzed, deleted, and rewritten the crap out of a few of my LinkedIn recommendations. I’ve only done a few, (I know shame on me) but I know there are more people that have helped me along the way in my career and definitely deserve recognition.

(Flickr photo: rights reserved by clasesdeperiodismo)

(Flickr photo: rights reserved by clasesdeperiodismo)

2014 is the year I’m going to start writing recommendations at least once a month. I had to come up with some kind of strategy in order to take the stress off of writing them in order to just write the damn things.  Here is what I’ve come up with:

Start With A Great Opening

Like anything else you would write you want to start with a line that will really grab your audience’s attention and make them want to read on. What good is a recommendation if no one reads it?

Describe Your Relationship

You’ll want to give the reader information about how you know this person. Specify any projects you’ve worked on together. Talk about how long you’ve know the person. You don’t have to give all the details as LinkedIn will show how you’re connected. Most importantly, make sure people know that your experience was positive! (I mean you wouldn’t be writing the recommendation if it wasn’t, right?)

Share What Makes Them Standout 

Of course the person you’re recommending is smart, talented, organized, and a pleasure to work with. Think about it, what are two things that the person you’re recommending does better than anyone else? You could also ask the person what they would like you to write about. Perhaps they’re looking for a new job, and they want you to write about one or two specific highlights that might help them land a new gig.

Add Some Personality

Everyone wants to work with someone who can get the job done, but they also want someone that is great to work with. Add something like “I’ve sought her advice on topics ranging from food reviews to events publishing, and I trust her judgment (unless it involves NFL football–[grin]–don’t say anything bad about #4).” (This blurb is from my own LinkedIn page)

Seal The Deal

Short, sweet and straight to the point. “Chad would be a great asset to any team.”

I’m committing to at least one new LinkedIn recommendation a month in 2014. I hope these tips will help you write some new recommendations for your peers in the new year.

LinkedIn’s University Pages: Brilliant or Dumb?

 

This is a guest post from Kacy Capobres, a writer, reporter and social media manager based in New York City.

This past week, LinkedIn created quite a stir with the announcement of their new University Pages.

Designed to attract college and career minded kids as young as 13-years-old, LinkedIn has high hopes their latest strategy can help students “at every critical milestone from campus to fulfilling, successful careers.”

In a company blog post, LinkedIn described their vision for the service, which will launch September 12th.  Aside from attracting younger users to their site, LinkedIn hopes to facilitate conversations between students with the over 200 universities across the globe that have chosen to participate.

By giving students student access to information about notable alumni and contacts from schools they are interested in, LinkedIn boasts that users of the service have the potential to create a lifelong professional network.

Linkedin Centipedes at 2010 Bay to Breakers

This past week, LinkedIn created quite a stir with the announcement of their new University Pages. Photo Credit: Flickr: smi23le

However, LinkedIn’s desire to recruit a younger audience to the career-networking site has already begun to raise some concern.

Along with privacy issues for the new young users, some now say the company’s creditability could be called into question.

Unlike most social networking sites, LinkedIn is synonymous with the professional world. Along with losing an element of exclusivity, the addition of such a younger audience also changes the scope of service the website provides as a key recruiting base for companies.

While it is unlikely the University Pages will be the cause of the demise of LinkedIn as we know it, only time will tell if this newest experiment will pay off in the end.

How do you feel about high school students joining your professional social media community?

 

Four Best Practices For LinkedIn Ads

It seems as though more and more clients are coming to us for LinkedIn ads – and with bigger budgets. These are mainly B2B companies looking to generate leads, drive traffic to a website or a LinkedIn company page. Here are some best practices to consider if you are thinking about running some LinkedIn ads for your business.

Set Yourself Up For Success

First and foremost you need to establish the goal of the ad campaign. Do you want to drive traffic to your website or your LinkedIn company page? LinkedIn allows you to choose either one.

Take Advantage of Ad Variations 

LinkedIn allows you to create up to 15 ad variations for a single ad campaign. This gives you the opportunity to test different calls-to-action, variety of headlines and images to see what works and what doesn’t work. You can even set the variations to rotate evenly or optimize the click through rate, so the more productive ads are shown more.

Target the Right Audiences

After the ad has been created, it’s time to start targeting your audience. LinkedIn offers location, company, job title, school, skills, group, gender and age. The company section includes the option to target companies by name or by category, but the more useful is targeting companies by name. The group section is a great tool as well because you target members of a specific LinkedIn group. Just remember not get too targeted, LinkedIn recommends having an estimated target audience of 100,000+.

Pay Per Clicks vs. Pay Per Impressions

Depending on the goal of the campaign, you can choose to pay per 1,000 impressions or pay per click. More often than not we use the pay per click option because you can track who has actually click on the ad.

Have you implemented your own LinkedIn ads program? What was your experience? What kind of results did you get? Share your tips and tricks with us.

The LinkedIn Hack: 5 Must-Reads

Here are 5 must-reads on the LinkedIn hack in which more than 6 million users’ passwords were stolen.

Linkedin logo

LinkedIn Hacked: How To Protect Yourself Online
By Dave Johnson Security problems are pervasive, and any site that requires a password is susceptible to this sort of thing. That’s why it’s time to review the essential requirements to keeping your passwords safe and secure.

LinkedIn Breach Puts Site’s Reputation On The Line
By Jim Finkle and Jennifer Saba LinkedIn Corp’s silence on the extent of a security breach that exposed millions of user passwords has damaged its reputation among some business professionals, and may slow the growing company’s rise if the breach turns out to be more serious than disclosed.

LinkedIn Says Zero Accounts Have Been Compromised As A Result Of The Password Leaks
By Tom Cheredar In a blog post reaffirming its commitment to security yesterday, LinkedIn claimed that it has no evidence of any accounts being compromised as a result of the security breach.

LinkedIn Defends Reaction in Wake of Password Theft
By Shayndi Rice and Ben Worthen The social-networking service for professionals has been criticized for not including an extra layer of password security known as salting, and for not having a chief security officer. LinkedIn moved to reassure customers about the security of their data.

Lax Security At LinkedIn Is Laid Bare
By Nicole Perlroth That LinkedIn was attacked did not surprise anyone. Companies’ computer systems are attacked every day. What has surprised customers and security experts alike is that a company that collects and profits from vast amounts of data had taken a bare-bones approach to protecting it.

LinkedIn Loosens Its Tie & Shows Its Funny Side

All work and no play makes LinkedIn a dull boy. They loosened up a bit and showed a sense of humor with a marketing parody video they played at the D10 conference.

Linkedin Commercial

Take a look…


[Video URL: http://bit.ly/LKNdYi]

What do you think? Do you like the ‘softer side’ of LinkedIn?

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